Harry Evans Park, Arana Hills - Shared pathway and playground

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Moreton Bay Regional Council supports a healthy and active lifestyle for our communities by investing in safe, efficient, reliable and integrated transport networks.

As part of this commitment we are proposing to build a new shared pathway and playground at Harry Evans Park in Arana Hills between Dinterra Avenue and Jane Street.

The project will deliver:

  • a safer option for commuting and exercising by getting people off busy roads like Patricks Road
  • better connectivity for Ferny Hills and Arana Hills communities to local schools, shopping and activity centres
  • a crucial missing link between the Hills District and Brisbane’s northern suburbs.

Following community consultation in late 2020, Council has now completed environmental assessments and preliminary design for the project.


Project Inclusions

  • 3m wide shared pathway for cyclists and pedestrians between Dinterra Avenue and Jane Street
  • CCTV for security
  • fencing from adjoining properties
  • wayfinding signage to direct users between the pathway and surrounding streets, parks, schools and shops
  • fauna friendly LED lighting
  • restoration of the vegetation along the riparian zone of Kedron Brook
  • a local level playground facility at the end of Dinterra Avenue


Community Feedback

Council received 180 responses during the community consultation undertaken in October and November 2020, 85% of which were from residents of Arana Hills and Ferny Hills.

Over 60% of the feedback was supportive of the project. You told us the new pathway will provide better connectivity and a safer option for active travel around the Hills District.

Several concerns were raised during the consultation about environmental impacts, safety, security, amenity and connecting infrastructure. In response, Council has been working closely with the designer and environmental consultant to consider these concerns in the design.


Managing environmental impacts

Council understands the natural environment of the project area is important to the local community. We are committed to minimising and managing the environmental impact of the project as much as possible.

We have engaged a specialist environmental consult to carrying out a comprehensive environmental assessment of the project area and surrounds. This will inform the alignment selection, design and mitigation measures.

How we are minimising environmental impacts?

The alignment of the pathway has been selected to have the least impact on the native vegetation and wildlife as possible. Additionally, the following measures will be incorporated into the pathway to minimise the impact on the environment:

  • tree root protection zones and elevated sections of path to reduce the number of impacted trees
  • an alignment that:
    1. considers existing riparian vegetation, canopy trees and habitat trees
    2. aims to protect existing koala food and habitat trees and movement corridors
    3. considers breeding and foraging habitat for tusked frog.
  • drainage that considers water sensitive urban design principles
  • suitable erosion and sedimentation controls in the design and during construction
  • LED fauna friendly bollard lighting and in-ground path markers to minimise light spill and disturbance for adjacent fauna habitats
  • landscaping that helps to control weeds and clears invasive species
  • offset planting for the trees removed as part of the project
  • nesting boxes to mitigate loss of habitat trees.

Council may also establish a bushcare group if there is adequate community interest and support to sustain the group.

Summary of environmental investigations

A range of investigations have been carried out as part of the environmental assessment including targeted site surveys, cultural heritage and native title assessments, and a tree survey and vegetation assessment. These have identified:

  • grey-headed flying fox, koala and white-throated needletail (sometimes known as stormbirds) habitat within and adjacent to the project area
  • low koala activity levels
  • thirteen animal breeding places within or adjacent the project area
  • essential habitat mapping for tusked frog as well as breeding habitat in a downstream tributary

The ecological assessment report for the project is currently being prepared and will be shared here in the coming months.

Tree removal

To accommodate the new pathway, the following trees are expected to be removed:

  • one habitat tree
  • 22 non-juvenile koala habitat trees
  • 16 other trees.

A list of these trees, including species and size is provided on the preliminary design plans. The trees to be removed as part of the project may change as the design is finalised.

Offset planting will be undertaken at a rate of 3:1 to compensate for the trees removed as part of the project. Every effort will be made to carry out offset planning within the local area wherever possible.

Additional offsets may also be required to address impacts to koala and native vegetation under the Vegetation Management Act 1999 and will be determined in consultation with the State Government.


Safety, security and amenity

To ensure the pathway is safe for all users and the security and amenity of neighbouring properties is maintained, several features have been incorporated into the design. These include:

  • new 1.8 metre high timber fences along the boundary of properties adjoining the project area. Fences will be installed in liaison with property owners
  • CCTV cameras and lighting along the pathway
  • minimising the removal of vegetation along the property boundary line as much as possible.

Council has consulted with Queensland Police Service about the new pathway and they have provided advice that “there are no trends that would indicate there is a large amount of crime that would result in security concerns for residents in the local area”.


Connecting infrastructure

The new pathway will provide a connection between the existing pathway infrastructure in Dinterra Avenue, Kylie Avenue and Jane Street.

Cyclists may choose to ride on the road, so as part of the project, Jane Street and Dinterra Avenue will be marked as bicycle awareness zones (BAZ’s) to bring to drivers’ attention the potential to encounter cyclists on-road.

Council will consider improvements to pathway infrastructure at each end of the project in the future, subject to further investigation and funding.


Consideration of alternative pathway alignments

In the early planning phase of the project, Council considered several alignment options for the pathway, including:

  • Option 1 - Dinterra Avenue to 33 Jane Street - Chosen alignment
  • Option 2 - Dinterra Avenue to 17 Jane Street (via the sewer easement between number 15 and 19)
  • Option 3 - Dinterra Avenue to Kedron Brook, including a new bridge crossing

The current alignment (option 1) was selected due to constructability issues and significant cost differences with the other alignment options.


Golden Valley Keperra Lions Building

The GVK Lions Club will be relocating from the old scout hall at the Dinterra Avenue end of Harry Evans Park to a brand-new building in James Drysdale Reserve. This will enable the installation of a local playground in the area including a small shelter and seating. The playground will complement the existing playgrounds available in George Willmore Park, Sue Miller Park, Bruce Smith Park and Melrose Park.

Click here for more information on the relocation of the GVK Lions Building.

Moreton Bay Regional Council supports a healthy and active lifestyle for our communities by investing in safe, efficient, reliable and integrated transport networks.

As part of this commitment we are proposing to build a new shared pathway and playground at Harry Evans Park in Arana Hills between Dinterra Avenue and Jane Street.

The project will deliver:

  • a safer option for commuting and exercising by getting people off busy roads like Patricks Road
  • better connectivity for Ferny Hills and Arana Hills communities to local schools, shopping and activity centres
  • a crucial missing link between the Hills District and Brisbane’s northern suburbs.

Following community consultation in late 2020, Council has now completed environmental assessments and preliminary design for the project.


Project Inclusions

  • 3m wide shared pathway for cyclists and pedestrians between Dinterra Avenue and Jane Street
  • CCTV for security
  • fencing from adjoining properties
  • wayfinding signage to direct users between the pathway and surrounding streets, parks, schools and shops
  • fauna friendly LED lighting
  • restoration of the vegetation along the riparian zone of Kedron Brook
  • a local level playground facility at the end of Dinterra Avenue


Community Feedback

Council received 180 responses during the community consultation undertaken in October and November 2020, 85% of which were from residents of Arana Hills and Ferny Hills.

Over 60% of the feedback was supportive of the project. You told us the new pathway will provide better connectivity and a safer option for active travel around the Hills District.

Several concerns were raised during the consultation about environmental impacts, safety, security, amenity and connecting infrastructure. In response, Council has been working closely with the designer and environmental consultant to consider these concerns in the design.


Managing environmental impacts

Council understands the natural environment of the project area is important to the local community. We are committed to minimising and managing the environmental impact of the project as much as possible.

We have engaged a specialist environmental consult to carrying out a comprehensive environmental assessment of the project area and surrounds. This will inform the alignment selection, design and mitigation measures.

How we are minimising environmental impacts?

The alignment of the pathway has been selected to have the least impact on the native vegetation and wildlife as possible. Additionally, the following measures will be incorporated into the pathway to minimise the impact on the environment:

  • tree root protection zones and elevated sections of path to reduce the number of impacted trees
  • an alignment that:
    1. considers existing riparian vegetation, canopy trees and habitat trees
    2. aims to protect existing koala food and habitat trees and movement corridors
    3. considers breeding and foraging habitat for tusked frog.
  • drainage that considers water sensitive urban design principles
  • suitable erosion and sedimentation controls in the design and during construction
  • LED fauna friendly bollard lighting and in-ground path markers to minimise light spill and disturbance for adjacent fauna habitats
  • landscaping that helps to control weeds and clears invasive species
  • offset planting for the trees removed as part of the project
  • nesting boxes to mitigate loss of habitat trees.

Council may also establish a bushcare group if there is adequate community interest and support to sustain the group.

Summary of environmental investigations

A range of investigations have been carried out as part of the environmental assessment including targeted site surveys, cultural heritage and native title assessments, and a tree survey and vegetation assessment. These have identified:

  • grey-headed flying fox, koala and white-throated needletail (sometimes known as stormbirds) habitat within and adjacent to the project area
  • low koala activity levels
  • thirteen animal breeding places within or adjacent the project area
  • essential habitat mapping for tusked frog as well as breeding habitat in a downstream tributary

The ecological assessment report for the project is currently being prepared and will be shared here in the coming months.

Tree removal

To accommodate the new pathway, the following trees are expected to be removed:

  • one habitat tree
  • 22 non-juvenile koala habitat trees
  • 16 other trees.

A list of these trees, including species and size is provided on the preliminary design plans. The trees to be removed as part of the project may change as the design is finalised.

Offset planting will be undertaken at a rate of 3:1 to compensate for the trees removed as part of the project. Every effort will be made to carry out offset planning within the local area wherever possible.

Additional offsets may also be required to address impacts to koala and native vegetation under the Vegetation Management Act 1999 and will be determined in consultation with the State Government.


Safety, security and amenity

To ensure the pathway is safe for all users and the security and amenity of neighbouring properties is maintained, several features have been incorporated into the design. These include:

  • new 1.8 metre high timber fences along the boundary of properties adjoining the project area. Fences will be installed in liaison with property owners
  • CCTV cameras and lighting along the pathway
  • minimising the removal of vegetation along the property boundary line as much as possible.

Council has consulted with Queensland Police Service about the new pathway and they have provided advice that “there are no trends that would indicate there is a large amount of crime that would result in security concerns for residents in the local area”.


Connecting infrastructure

The new pathway will provide a connection between the existing pathway infrastructure in Dinterra Avenue, Kylie Avenue and Jane Street.

Cyclists may choose to ride on the road, so as part of the project, Jane Street and Dinterra Avenue will be marked as bicycle awareness zones (BAZ’s) to bring to drivers’ attention the potential to encounter cyclists on-road.

Council will consider improvements to pathway infrastructure at each end of the project in the future, subject to further investigation and funding.


Consideration of alternative pathway alignments

In the early planning phase of the project, Council considered several alignment options for the pathway, including:

  • Option 1 - Dinterra Avenue to 33 Jane Street - Chosen alignment
  • Option 2 - Dinterra Avenue to 17 Jane Street (via the sewer easement between number 15 and 19)
  • Option 3 - Dinterra Avenue to Kedron Brook, including a new bridge crossing

The current alignment (option 1) was selected due to constructability issues and significant cost differences with the other alignment options.


Golden Valley Keperra Lions Building

The GVK Lions Club will be relocating from the old scout hall at the Dinterra Avenue end of Harry Evans Park to a brand-new building in James Drysdale Reserve. This will enable the installation of a local playground in the area including a small shelter and seating. The playground will complement the existing playgrounds available in George Willmore Park, Sue Miller Park, Bruce Smith Park and Melrose Park.

Click here for more information on the relocation of the GVK Lions Building.

If you have any questions about the project, please submit them here.

Why don't you ask a question?