Local Laws Review

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It’s time to put your case forward and join the debate on how we regulate

Council wants your ideas to help set our communities' standards on:

  • Animal-keeping (e.g. the number that residents can keep)
  • Backyard fire pits
  • Businesses on public land
  • Advertising signs
  • Overgrown lawns, noisy air conditioners and unsightly pools
  • Festivals and events
  • Parking
  • Dangerous activities on public land (golf, BMX, remote aircraft, etc.)
  • Many more matters!

These issues are currently regulated under Council's Local Laws.

A review of the current Local Laws is underway, and we are inviting your input.

Local laws are designed to respond to local issues and help improve the liveability of our communities for everyone.

A summary of each matter and the law that applies can be viewed below.


Have your say

From 1 April until 30 June 2021 Council is asking you to tell us what you would do if you were the maker of Local Laws (using survey below):

  1. What issues do you have relating to Local Law matters?
  2. What ideas do you have to resolve these issues?


Alternative ways to provide comment

If you are unable to access our online survey, you can write to Council with your responses at:

Correspondence must be received by Council by 5.00pm on 30 June 2021.


Next steps

A summary of community feedback will be made available on Council’s website. You will not be individually identified in any reports.

Council will consider all community feedback alongside expert opinions to draft the revised Local Laws.

The draft laws will then be made available for inspection and comment before being finalised.

It’s time to put your case forward and join the debate on how we regulate

Council wants your ideas to help set our communities' standards on:

  • Animal-keeping (e.g. the number that residents can keep)
  • Backyard fire pits
  • Businesses on public land
  • Advertising signs
  • Overgrown lawns, noisy air conditioners and unsightly pools
  • Festivals and events
  • Parking
  • Dangerous activities on public land (golf, BMX, remote aircraft, etc.)
  • Many more matters!

These issues are currently regulated under Council's Local Laws.

A review of the current Local Laws is underway, and we are inviting your input.

Local laws are designed to respond to local issues and help improve the liveability of our communities for everyone.

A summary of each matter and the law that applies can be viewed below.


Have your say

From 1 April until 30 June 2021 Council is asking you to tell us what you would do if you were the maker of Local Laws (using survey below):

  1. What issues do you have relating to Local Law matters?
  2. What ideas do you have to resolve these issues?


Alternative ways to provide comment

If you are unable to access our online survey, you can write to Council with your responses at:

Correspondence must be received by Council by 5.00pm on 30 June 2021.


Next steps

A summary of community feedback will be made available on Council’s website. You will not be individually identified in any reports.

Council will consider all community feedback alongside expert opinions to draft the revised Local Laws.

The draft laws will then be made available for inspection and comment before being finalised.

  • Local annoyances and hazards

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    Local Law regulates a diverse range of local annoyances and hazards. These include:

    • noise pollution (e.g. from air-conditioning units, pool pumps and building works)
    • local pests
    • overgrown and unsightly allotments
    • barbed wire and electric fencing
    • dumped shopping trolleys.

    Read more: Local annoyances and hazards Local Law extract.

  • Outdoor dining

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    Local Law regulates commercial use of local government areas. A business must obtain approval from Council to be able to use outdoor space as a dining area.

    Local Law sets out the approval process, documents that must accompany applications (including a detailed site plan), criteria for granting applications and conditions to be imposed on an approval.

    Conditions include:

    • notifying Council if damage is caused to the road or infrastructure
    • standards for ensuring hygiene and cleanliness
    • any furniture or equipment in the outdoor dining area must not impinge upon traffic controls, access to public utilities, pedestrian crossings or bus stops.

    Read more: Outdoor dining Local Law extract.

  • Parking and traffic signs

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    Local Law regulates parking via permits that allow people to park contrary to a restriction/traffic sign.

    It also lists several minor offences and the penalties that apply.

    For example, you must not:

    • park a vehicle in a designated parking space unless a parking meter installed indicated the parking fee has been paid
    • park a vehicle in a designated space for longer than the maximum time indicated on an official traffic sign installed for the space
    • stop an unauthorised vehicle in a loading zone.

    Read more: Parking Local Law extract.

  • Regulatory signs

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    Local Law prohibits a person from conducting an activity contrary to a regulatory sign (e.g. diving, swimming or fishing).

    It also provides for activities that can only be undertaken in areas as permitted by a sign (i.e. horse riding, camping or accessing a foreshore).

    Read more: Regulatory Signage Local Law extract.

  • Removing vegetation and materials

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    Under Local Law a person requires approval to:

    • remove or interfere with any fauna, plants, plant material, trees, soil, sand, rocks or other material on a local government-controlled area
    • remove water from a lake or dam within a local government-controlled area.

    Read more: Removing material Local Law extract.

  • Roadside and itinerant vending

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    Local Law regulates roadside and itinerant vending. You must obtain an approval from Council for these activities.

    Local Law sets out the approval process, including documents that must support applications, criteria for granting an application and conditions imposed on an approval (e.g. public liability insurance, TMR approvals for State roads, food licences, waste disposal, cleanliness of site, traffic safety, signage requirements and distance requirements from bricks and mortar businesses).

    Read more: Roadside and itinerant vending Local Law extract.

  • Share accommodation

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    Local Law regulates share accommodation within Council’s region (accommodation for occupation by six or more residents, in return for payment, where the residents share one or more facilities e.g. toilets). You must obtain an approval from Council before you can operate a shared accommodation facility.

    Local Law sets out the approval process, including documents that must accompany applications, criteria for granting applications and conditions imposed on approvals (e.g. maximum number of persons to be accommodated, fire prevention requirements, maintenance/cleanliness of facilities and requirements for bedrooms, kitchens, laundries and toilets).

    Read more: Share accommodation Local Law extract.

  • Smoking in public places

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    Local Law does not currently regulate smoking in public places.

    The Queensland Government has banned smoking in several public spaces.

    Some of these bans include:

    • all Queensland hospitals, health and residential aged care facilities
    • major sport and event facilities except for nominated outdoor smoking areas
    • inside eating or drinking venues.

    Council can ban smoking in outdoor public spaces not covered by state-wide smoking bans.

  • Swimming pools

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    Local Law approval is required before you can operate a public swimming pool (amongst other approvals).

    Local Law sets out the approval process, including documents that must be accompany applications, criteria for granting applications and conditions to be imposed on an approval (e.g. compliance with approved guidelines or standard).

    Read more: Swimming pool Local Law extract.

  • Temporary entertainment events (including festivals and fetes)

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    Local Law regulates the operation of temporary entertainment events, including one-off events such as: music festivals, rodeos, circuses and markets.

    A person or group seeking to host a temporary entertainment event must obtain approval from Council.

    Some of the documents which must be provided in the application include:

    • detailed site plan and attendance estimates
    • proof of liability insurance
    • risk management plan (including waste, traffic, first aid, evacuation, security and noise management)
    • copies of any other relevant licences (e.g. Liquor license if alcohol is to be served).

    Read more: Temporary entertainment events Local Law extract.